loader
LECTURES
0 Lessons
QUESTIONS
0 Quizzes
ENROLLED
0 Student
REVIEWS

Faculty – International Design School

Program Supervisor
Professor Nicholas Shavishvili

Qualification to award
Master of Fine Arts in Design

will be awarded in case of passing not less than 120 credits of an educational program.

The language of teaching
English

Precondition for admission to the program:
Applicant is admitted in compliance with the Georgian Legislation.

Description of the program
Master Educational English Language program “Design” is a two-year program. It comprises a range of courses in
the Humanities, Social and Technical Sciences. The program include learning courses and research
component
The program consists of 120 ECTS credits that are arranged in a following manner:
1. Learning courses -75 credits: mandatory -60 credits, elective courses – 15 credits);
2. Research component 45 credits :

The purpose of the program

This programme is intended to enhance the knowledge and skills of design professionals, and those of other
disciplines, to enter or continue within diverse careers in the design disciplines, and other allied professional
disciplines. The programme extends the students’ critical understanding of the historical and contemporary
social, cultural, economic and political contexts of design, while providing advanced, state-of-the-art specialized
training and experience — in design practice, processes and methods — necessary to undertake complex, multifaceted design projects, and produce professional design outcomes and results to an international standard.
Graduates of the programme will be imbued with the requisite knowledge and skills to continue their careers as
successful practicing designers who are able to make a positive contribution to the community of designers,
design stakeholders, and society at large. Graduates will also gain a rigorous scholarly grounding and experience
appropriate for life-long learning and further doctoral education.

Learning Outcomes and Competences (General and Sectoral)
Knowledge and understanding:
Advanced knowledge and understanding based on re-analysis and re-evaluation of new interpretations on the
interactions between design and society.
Each of the semester consists of 30 credits.
First semester consists 30 credits learning course ( mandatory 25 credits ; elective 5 credits)
Second semester consists 30 credits: Learning course 25 credits (mandatory 20 credits; elective 5 credits) and
Research component 5 credits.
Third semester consists 30 credits: Learning course 20 credits (mandatory 15 credits; elective 5 credits) and
Research component 10 credits.
Fourth Semester consists 30 credits Research component (Master Thesis).
One credit equals to 25 hours, comprised of in-class and independent work.
A year of the study program (2 semesters,) is scheduled accordingly: 15 weeks of each semester.
The First Year courses introduces students to the fundamental social, cultural, economic and political
structures that govern contemporary material and visual culture. By tracing the history of examples of social
behavior, students understand how the production and consumption of goods and services came to be as they
are. Students will research into topics on the field of design; to develop and sharpen their critical perspective on
the production and consumption of goods and services—a fundamentally important aspect of society today.
Students will learn the design process, becoming visual thinkers, problem solvers and creative communicators.
Students will iterate a cycle of the designed product while focusing on innovation and speed.
Second Year courses combine classroom theory with practical work experience, promotes the development of
students’ professional training level and practical skills, strengthening the theoretical knowledge acquired at
learning in IDS, and acquiring the characteristics of real design of objects in the design process. Gives students
the opportunity to discover the creative initiative and create an appropriate environment for independent
action, aims at facilitating students to pursue the design practices with the methods through which the designs
are implemented and solvency problems are solved. The courses advance the knowledge of use of the customer’s
product by analyzing product and service disruptions, consumer needs and human criteria, and meeting the
needs of consumers by implementing the latest design approaches and methods, develop student’s critical analysis
skills when making sustainable decisions. Teach the latest approaches to sustainable design, modern trends of
production and consumption.
The final step of the study is the completion and defense of a Master Thesis, while the student must demonstrate
the multifaceted knowledge obtained during the course of studies. The prerequisite for the defense of the
master’s thesis is to obtain all basic educational and research components (90 credits). The project have to be
presented in front of an interdisciplinary Examination Board, that is created for this sole purpose; The Board
have to be comprised of examiners, who have relevant experience and knowledge needed for adequate
assessment of a Master Thesis.
This programme is intended to enhance the knowledge and skills of design professionals, and those of other
disciplines, to enter or continue within diverse careers in the design disciplines, and other allied professional
disciplines. The programme extends the students’ critical understanding of the historical and contemporary
social, cultural, economic and political contexts of design, while providing advanced, state-of-the-art specialized
training and experience — in design practice, processes and methods — necessary to undertake complex, multifaceted design projects,

and produce professional design outcomes and results to an international standard.
Graduates of the programme will be imbued with the requisite knowledge and skills to continue their careers as
successful practicing designers who are able to make a positive contribution to the community of designers,
design stakeholders, and society at large. Graduates will also gain a rigorous scholarly grounding and experience
appropriate for life-long learning and further doctoral education.

Advanced knowledge and understanding based on re-analysis and re-evaluation of the state-of-the-art of
disciplines closely associated to design, including ergonomics; sustainable design; management and design
management.
Applying knowledge:
Able to independently plan and apply advanced creativity techniques, design methods, and innovation processes
of the specialized fields of design, to a wide range of design problems, under varying conditions, using advanced
state-of-the-art techniques, software and processes.
Able to independently plan and carry out advanced research into ergonomics, to consider the relations between
humans and other elements of systems, and to develop design outcomes that optimise human well-being and
overall system performance, and to produce research outcomes and new knowledge that have a bearing on the
body of knowledge at an international level.
Applying advanced understanding knowledge of sustainable design to do research, to develop design outcomes
that address the problems of sustainability, to produce research outcomes and new knowledge that have a bearing
on the body of knowledge at an international level.
Applying advanced methods from the social sciences, for example, anthropology, to do research, and for greater
understanding, to solve problems encountered by users and stakeholders, and to produce research outcomes and
new knowledge that have a bearing on the body of knowledge at an international level.
Making judgements:
The broad education necessary to understand the social, cultural, economic and political forces shaping the design
fields in contemporary society and how they impact design processes and outcomes.
A critical understanding of the impact of design and results processes on stakeholders and society at large and
capable of providing advice to users and stakeholders on these issues.
Able to analyse and interpret quantitative and qualitative data and form reasoned conclusions on their basis.
Able to provide strategic business advice, to plan and implement business models, and to judge the value,
appropriateness, feasibility, and other pertinent qualities, of design and business decisions.
Communication skills:
Able to communicate in written form and verbally with a variety of stakeholders, including clients, technicians
and engineers, members of the public and officials; and undertake advanced research and write reports in English,
and a second foreign language.
Able to communicate in written form and verbally and to engage in thematic debates with colleagues from the
international scientific community in English and a second foreign language.
Learning skills:
Able to reflect on design methods, design processes and outcomes of the design process, and able to proscribe
remedial action to address problems and one’s own short-comings.
Able to engage in life-long learning, self-directed research, and able to undertake further education, such as
doctoral studies.
Readiness to further develop new ideas or processes stemming from knowledge, that is based on recent
developments in the course of learning and professional activity, and in the course of research.
Values:
Able to engage in a reasoned debate within an international community of practitioners and scholars about the
design disciplines, their effects, and the impacts of design activities and outcomes.
Provide leadership in confronting the profound challenges brought on by sustainability and environmental
degradation, and social and economic problems; while leading and enrolling colleagues from the design
community in an inclusive, democratic, and open approach to applying the scientific approaches and research
tools to addressing those complex problems.
Creative, innovative and entrepreneurial leaders, employing design and intellectual property rights for wealth
creation and other benefits.

Methods of achieving learning outcomes (teaching and learning)
Lecture Seminar (work in group) Practical Laboratory practice Course paper / project
Master’s paper Consultation Independent work
The most widely spread teaching and learning methods as well as their definitions are given below. A teacher
should choose the proper method according to the concrete aim and problem.
1. Discussion/debates. This is the most widely spread method of interactive teaching. A discussion process
greatly increases the quality of students’ involvement and their activity. A discussion may turn into an argument
and this process is not merely confined to the questions posed by the teacher. It develops students’ skills of
reasoning and substantiating their own ideas. 2. Cooperative teaching is a teaching strategy in the process of
which each member of a group not only has to learn the subject himself, but also to help his fellow-student to
learn it better. Each member of the group works at the problem until all of them master the issue.
3. Collaborative work; using this method implies dividing students into separate groups and giving each group its
own task. The group members work at their issues individually and at the same time share their opinions with
the rest of the group. According to the problem raised, it is possible to shift the functions among the group
members in this process. This strategy ensures the students’ maximum involvement in the learning process.
4. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method which uses a concrete problem as the initial stage both for
acquiring new knowledge and integration process.
5. Heuristic method is based on the step-by-step solving of a given problem. It is realized by means of
independent fixing of the facts in the teaching process and determining the ties among them.
6. Case study – the teacher discusses concrete cases together with the students and they study the issue
thoroughly. E.g., in the sphere of engineering safety it can be a discussion of a concrete accident or catastrophe.
7. Brain storming – this method implies forming and presenting as many radically different ideas and opinions
on a given topic as possible. This method sets conditions for developing a creative approach towards a problem.
This method is effective in a large group of students and consists of the following stages:
 using a creative approach for defining a problem/issue;
 for a certain period of time listing (mainly on the blackboard) students’ ideas on the problem without any
criticism;
 determining the evaluation criteria for stating the correspondence of the idea to the aim of the research;
 evaluating the chosen ideas according to the previously determined criteria;
 selecting the ideas that most of all correspond to the given issue by applying the method of exclusion;
 revealing the best idea for solving the given problem.
8. Role-playing games and simulations – games played according to a previously prepared scenario enable
students to estimate the problem from different standpoints. They help students to form alternative points of
view. Such games as well as discussions help students to develop skills of independently expressing their own
ideas and participating in discussions.
9. Demonstration method implies presenting information with the help of visual aids. It is quite effective in
reaching the required result. It is frequently advisable to present the material simultaneously through audio and
visual means. The material can be presented both by a teacher and a student. This method helps us to make
different steps of perceiving the teaching material more obvious, specify what steps the students are supposed to
take independently; at the same time this strategy visually shows the essence of an issue/problem.
Demonstration can be very simple. 10. Inductive method determines such a form of conveying any kind of
knowledge when in the process of learning the train of thought is oriented from facts towards generalization, i.e.
while presenting the material the process goes from concrete to general. 11. Deductive method determines such
a form of conveying any kind of knowledge which presents a logical process of discovering new knowledge on
the basis of general knowledge, i.e. the process goes from general to concrete. 12. Analytical method helps us to
divide the whole teaching material into constituent parts. In this way the detailed interpretation of separate
issues within the given complex problem is simplified. 13. Synthetic method implies forming one issue from
several separate ones. This method helps students to develop the ability of seeing the problem as a whole. 14.
– 5 – of 10
Verbal or oral method comprises a lecture, narration, conversation, etc. During the process the teacher conveys,
explains the material verbally, and students perceive and learn it by comprehending and memorizing.
15. Written method implies the following forms of activity: copying, taking notes, composing theses, writing
essays, etc.
16. Laboratory method implies the following forms of activity: conducting experiments, showing video
materials, etc.
17. Practical methods unite all the teaching forms that stimulate developing practical skills in students. In this
case a student independently performs different kinds of activity on the basis of the knowledge acquired e.g.
field study, teaching practice, field work, etc.
18. Explanatory method is based on discussing a given issue. In the process of explaining the material the teacher
brings concrete examples the detailed analysis of which is made in the framework of the given topic.
19. Activity-oriented teaching implies teachers’ and students’ active involvement in the teaching process, when
practical interpretation of the theoretical material takes place.
20. Designing and presenting a project. While designing a project a student applies the knowledge and skills he
has acquired for solving a problem. Teaching by means of designing projects increases students’ motivation and
responsibility. Working on a project involves the stages of planning, research, practical activity and presenting
the results according to the chosen issue. The project is considered to be completed if its results are presented
clearly, convincingly, and correctly. It can be carried out individually, in pairs or in groups; also, within the
framework of one or several subjects (integration of subjects); on completion the project is presented to a large
audience.
21. E-learning implies using the Internet and multi-media means in the process of teaching. It comprises all the
components of the teaching process (aims, content, methods, means, etc.); the realization of these components
takes place through specific means. There are three types of e-learning:
 Full-time tuition; when the teaching process takes place during teachers’ and students’ contact hours, and
conveying the teaching material occurs through an e-course;
 Distant learning implies conducting the teaching process in the absence of a professor. The teaching course is
conducted distantly; in the e-format.
 Hybrid (full-time/distant) – teaching is mainly conducted distantly but a certain part of it is conducted during
contact hours.

Student knowledge assessment system
Grading system is based on a 100-point scale.
Positive grades:
 – Excellent – the rating of 91-100 points;
 – Very good – – the rating of 81-90 points
 – Good – the rating of 71-80 points
 – Satisfactory – the rating of 61-70 points
 – Enough – the rating of 51-60 points
Negative evaluation:
 (FX) – Did not pass – 41-50 points of rating, which means that the student needs more work to pass and
is given the right to take the exam once more with independent work;
 (F) – Failed – 40 points and less, which means that the work carried out by the student is not enough
and he/she has to learn the subject from the beginning.
Assessment forms:
In case of accumulation of 51 and more points, but in case of failure to overcome the minimum level of
competence in the final exam, as in the case of FX, the student once has the right to pass an additional
examination. The interval between the final and the addition examinations must be at least 5 days.
The number of assessment points received by the student in the additional examination will not be added to the

assessment score received in final exam. The assessment of additional exam is the concluding assessment and
will be reflected in the score of final evaluation of the component of the educational program. Taking in account
the final assessment of additional exam, in case of gaining the score of 0-50 points in the final evaluation of the
educational component, or in case of student failure to overcome the minimum competency level for the final /
additional exam, the student will be awarded the F-0 score.
Evaluation of the research component
Final exam /defense of research components (Master Project Thesis /Prospectus, Theoretical/Experimental
Research/Colloquium , “Master’s Qualification work completion and defense”), the maximum score of which are
100 points, is conducted once for the Master Program students;
The right to pass the final exam of Master Project Thesis/ Prospectus and Theoretical/experimental
Research/Colloquium has the Master Program student, who has performed and timely handed the minimum
amount of works defined by the program over to the Supervisor;
The right to pass the Master’s degree work defense has the student, who has fully completed all the components
provided by the Educational Program in the previous semesters and at the same time completed and timely
handed over the qualification work to the Supervisor;
In case of getting the scores FX – (41-50 points), the student is entitled to submit the revised scientific-research
component (Prospectus / Colloquium / Master’s qualification work) within the next semester; In case of getting
the scores of F- (40 points and less) he/she loses the right to present the same Prospectus / Colloquium /
Master’s Qualification work;
The assessment methods, criteria and scales of the student’s knowledge are given in syllabuses
Field of employment
Specialists in Interior and Furniture Design
 construction industry
 service industry
 entertainment industry
 leisure and the hotel trade
 employed by construction companies and related organisations, advertising agencies, consulting design
companies, or they may choose to be self-employed.
Specialists in Product Design:
 manufacturing industry
 packaging industry
 service industry
 computer software and hardware industry
 entertainment industry
 employed by industrial companies manufacturing consumer products and capital goods and software and
hardware, companies in the entertainment sector, consulting design companies
Specialists in Transportation Design
 automotive and vehicle industries
 service industry
 entertainment industry
 employed by industrial companies manufacturing consumer and commercial products, companies in the
entertainment sector, consulting design companies
Specialists in Visual Communication Design:

 publishing industry
 advertising and packaging industries
 media industries including the internet, television production and post-production
 computer software and hardware industry
service industry
entertainment industry
employed by industrial and media companies, industrial companies producing software and hardware,
advertising agencies, government agencies, NGOs, consulting design companies

Curriculum is empty

Instructor

0.00 average based on 0 ratings

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%
$3,800.00

Explore Recent Courses

  • $3,500.00
Master of Business Administration
0 Lessons
0 Student
  • $3,500.00
Civil Engineering
0 Lessons
0 Student